Et Tu, Brute? Verizon Appears to Have Hired Accenture to Renegotiate Cell Tower Leases Using Same Tired Threats of Relocation

Photo of Cell Tower
A cell tower with a substantial amount of equipment at the third RAD center
A municipal client, who has multiple public safety towers upon which Verizon is colocated, received a call and letter from a Verizon representative asking for reduced lease rate terms and escalation. The letter is on Verizon letterhead and does not make clear the relationship between Accenture and Verizon but refers to the Accenture employee or contractor as a "Verizon Representative." However, in the email from this representative, the signature block is for Accenture.  We surmise this means that Verizon is using Accenture instead of Black Dot or Md7 to renegotiate its leases. This is disappointing because Verizon has historically chosen not to stoop to these types of misleading negotiation tactics. And lest you think it is because of the ever more competitive wireless industry – Verizon still generates a very healthy 45.7% wireless profit margin.  

The letter states:  

As discussed during your recent call with ________, a Verizon representative, we are currently reviewing our real estate portfolio to assess market rates and trends. To remain competitive and provide the best value to our customers, we propose to modify our site lease terms, based on our knowledge of the market and our analysis of each site as follows:

 

 It further goes on to state (and this is the funny part):

Additionally, for all sites identified in this document, payment of rent shall include the following equipment rights:

  • 30,000 square inches wind load surface area at the RAD center (if available);
  • 10’ tip to tip RAD, if available. If not, space available up to 10’;
  • All you can build fixed fee amendments for the contract duration within the allotted tip to tip vertical and 30,000 square inches wind load surface area;
  • 16 cables;
  • No additional rent or fees for any additions or modifications to equipment throughout the contract term as long as the equipment rights identified above are not exceeded.

If we can't reach an agreement, we will remove you from our relocation list as we continue to evaluate our real estate portfolio.

As always, there is the implicit threat of termination – although carefully couched in language that doesn't constitute an anticipatory breach. So in essence, Verizon wants 30,000 square inches of equipment space in their 10' RAD center along with 16 cables. So no matter how much capacity this reduces on the tower or how much a tower owner would have to pay to structurally upgrade the tower to accommodate it, Verizon expects not to pay any additional fees. Generally, this is ludicrous and no tower owner should ever agree to this loading, regardless of whether they end up negotiating more favorable rent terms, in order to ensure the longevity of the lease. We aren't suggesting that Verizon may not eventually relocate some cell sites, just that it won't be that common and will be reserved for situations where they can save enough money by moving to justify the substantial expense of doing so.   

In this case, our municipal tower owner will be telling Verizon that they can keep their name on the relocation list. There is no chance on any of them that Verizon will end up moving. If you receive one of these Verizon/Accenture letters or calls threatening to renegotiate your lease or relocate the tower, please contact us.  

Want a Kinder Less Aggressive Tower Company Leasing Specialist? Just Fill Out a Survey!

Image of surveyOne of our client's called us yesterday to let us know that they had been beleaguered by a tower company rep who was perhaps too anxious and aggressive regarding a lease extension for a lease that wasn't set to expire for another 8 years.   This particular client has a Mona Lisa tower- a phrase American Tower used previously to refer to 4-6 carrier towers.   In other words, it wasn't going anywhere.   For some reason, the tower company rep felt that being aggressive and making all kinds of threats to move the tower and to cease discussions would make the landowner agree to the proposed terms.   

The landowner received a survey from the tower company- a generic one that asked about how the landowner felt about the tower company and whether lease payments were coming on time.   The landowner filled out the survey and added comments at the bottom that he didn't appreciate the rep's aggressive nature and angry demeanor.   Within a few days, the agent called him and apologized and the negotiations took a decidedly more friendly turn.    Perhaps that was because our client's tower is a very valuable tower.   Perhaps not.  Either way, if you are having a problem with your tower company rep and their negotiating tactics, fill out a survey or let the company know directly.   While the rep will and should continue to make threats about moving the tower, they should be able to do it in a less aggressive and cordial manner.  Both parties should remember that these negotiations are not personal, they are just business.  Treat the discussion as a business discussion, remove the personal aspect, and if you need help determining the business terms, consider contacting us.  

T-Mobile Sued for Alleged Unauthorized Attachment to High Tension Electric Tower

Utility pole cell tower

A few times a year, we are contacted by someone that believes that a wireless company attached equipment to an electric tower (not a small wood utility pole) on their property but that isn't getting compensation for it.  We just came across this news story where T-Mobile has a cell site attached to a utility pole and the landowners are not receiving any rent for the access to their property.  They are suing T-Mobile alleging that T-Mobile does not have the legal right to use the pole.  In the mid-2000's, there were a number of lawsuits, some class action, on this same issue.   In some, the landowners won and in others, the wireless carrier won.  

The key to whether a landowner should be compensated is based upon the language in the underlying utility easement for the electric towers.  The more specific the language is regarding what the easement is for, the better it is for the landowner.    If the easement language includes the right to provide telecommunication services or communication services, in many cases, that means that the utility company is within its rights to grant access to the wireless company without paying rent or getting landowner consent.   If the easement is specifically for the transmission of power, the wireless carrier may need your approval to be on the property which may mean additional rent.  

If you believe that the wireless carrier who has equipment on one of the electric towers on your property is improperly doing so, go to the clerk of court for your county or city and ask to see a copy of the utility easement across your property.   They are normally very helpful.   Get a copy and reach out to us.  While we cannot provide a legal interpretation of the easement language, we can advise whether you should spend the time and money to visit a local attorney.   If the attorney believes you should be compensated, we can help determine the appropriate amount for the lease or consent.   

Sprint Enters the Lease Renegotiation Game Again

A landowner client of ours received this email from LCC, a company allegedly acting on behalf of Sprint where they claim that if the landowner doesn't agree to concessions, that Lendlease will consider relocating the Sprint site.  

Screen shot of email from Sprint
Email from Sprint Representative to Landowner

If you receive a similar request from Sprint, LCC, or Lendlease or another cell tower lease optimization company, please contact us.  We can help you evaluate the proposal and determine whether it is probable that Sprint would move in the event you choose not to accept their proposed rent reduction.

Afraid of Rocking the Boat: When to Build Your Own Tower

Rocking the Boat.

A gentleman called us two days ago. He had been approached by a local tower company to build a cell tower on his property. We had an initial discussion, and he seemed intrigued by our services. The initial offer from the tower company was pretty decent, better than an initial offer should have been for this area. I suggested this to him and also suggested that typically when a tower company makes an offer like this, it is because the property is unique. This gentleman owned a significant amount of acres along a difficult-to-cover corridor. The tower company had no other choice but to use his property. [Read more…]

Cell Tower On Your Property Page

In going over our website statistics, we noticed that there is an increasing interest by landowners in having a cellular tower erected on their property.   Since 2007, over 150,000 unique visitors have visited our website and gone to this page.  There seems to be a clear trend that the number of visitors per month to the page has been increasing.   Clearly the economy plays a part in this- landowners are looking for any ancillary revenue they can find.   We suspect that increased awareness about cell tower leases and the potential revenue from towers is driving this trend as well.

Unfortunately, trying to get a cell tower lease is like trying to win the lottery except your odds are better with the lottery.   Out of over 10,000 people who have ever contacted us asking how they can get a tower lease, only one has ever contacted us back and said they actually got a lease by contacting the carriers.

Crossroads Wireless- Bankruptcy!

Many people contacted Steel in the Air, Inc about the possibility of getting assistance with negotiating land leases with Crossroads Wireless. After one or two consultations, we chose not to take on any of these clients because our experience in dealing with Crossroads agents proved that they would not make changes to their lease. [Read more…]

Cincinnati Bell Wireless and Lazy Site Acquisition

A potential client received a letter from Cincinnati Bell Wireless stating that they have reviewed the client’s property and were potentially interested in leasing a portion of the property for their cell tower site. The letter includes a template lease from Cincinnati Bell Wireless and a request for the landowner to review the lease with his/her attorney first to confirm which clauses that the landowner might find objectionable. [Read more…]